Thursday, May 19, 2016

BOMA San Francisco Government Affairs Members Meet with BART's General Manager - Grace Crunican




BOMA's Government Affairs Policy Advisory Committee members met with Grace Crunican recently to discuss BART's System Renewal Program Plan . Click here for her presentation. Our members look forward to collaborating with Grace and her team on the organization's future-forward vision for BART.

Grace Crunican
About Grace Crunican

Grace Crunican was appointed General Manager of the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit by the BART Board of Directors on August 31, 2011. She oversees a staff of 3,137 full time employees and a $15 billion transportation infrastructure. The Board of Directors selected Ms. Crunican because of her 32 years of experience in the public transportation industry, her proven leadership abilities, and her focus on providing safe and reliable transportation services for all Bay Area Communities. She brings to BART a reputation for transparency and accountability.

Prior to coming to BART, Ms. Crunican was Director of the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT). She guided SDOT in meeting the goals of Bridging the Gap, Seattle’s transportation maintenance levy, and implemented the Transit Master Plan – Seattle Connections, Bike Master Plan, Freight Mobility Strategic Plan and Pedestrian Master Plan, aimed at building a system to move more people and goods with fewer cars and helping Seattle achieve the U.S. Kyoto Protocol goals.

Previously, Ms. Crunican was the Director of the Oregon Department of Transportation for five years where she implemented Community Solution Teams, integrated livability objectives into transportation planning and instilled a customer focus throughout the department.

Her Washington DC experience includes being the Deputy Administrator for the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) from 1993 to 1996. Before joining the FTA, Grace led the Surface Transportation Project a nonprofit coalition dedicated to implementing the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act, or ISTEA.

Her first transportation appointment was in 1979 to the Presidential Management Intern Program for the U.S. Department of Transportation followed by serving as Professional Staff for Senate Transportation Appropriations Subcommittee.Ms. Crunican has local level experience working as the Deputy Director of Portland’s Department of Transportation. She holds a B.A. from Gonzaga University and a MBA from Willamette University.

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

BOMA Leaders Meet with San Francisco Assessor-Recorder Carmen Chu




BOMA San Francisco leaders recently met with San Francisco Assessor-Recorder, Carmen Chu.

Our members last met with Assessor Chu in 2015 and we were honored to welcome her again to provide an update of the improvements the Department has made over the last year, and to inform our members of a few challenges:
  • At this time in 2015, there were approximately 5000 outstanding assessment cases; there are 1000 now.
  • They have a brand new, customer focused, website.
  • There are about 12000 outstanding new construction projects which is unprecedented. The Assessor is required to calculate the economic impact of each project.
    • They need to hire more people or they will be further behind. 
  • Physical files abound but they have made significant improvements with their digital scanning project that will improve workflow.  
    • Assessor Chu is progressing with her goal to remove the paperwork that is sent in. In fact, all physical paperwork received is now immediately scanned.
  • Improving technology is still a challenge. 
    • There are limited options for off-the-shelf software for assessors to replace the current system. She wants to invest in the right program and will take the time to be sure the option selected is the most appropriate. 
About Carmen Chu

Carmen Chu was re-elected on November 4, 2014, to serve as the Assessor-Recorder for the City and County of San Francisco, and is committed to making government work for the people of San Francisco.

The work that the Office of the Assessor-Recorder does helps to generate over one-third of the City’s General Fund revenue—revenue which is used to fund crucial services like fire, police, neighborhood improvements, and health & family support services.

Since taking office, Chu has prioritized customer service and office efficiency. Beginning in 2013, she implemented e-Recording, which allows submitters to record documents from the convenience of their office or home. Chu has secured resources to address the increase in workload generated by historic highs in assessment appeals. This additional funding will allow the Assessment Appeals Board to schedule and hear appeals cases more quickly and ensure a more timely resolution for taxpayers. She also began the process of digitizing historic real property records currently maintained only in hard copy. This project will ensure that vital assessment details and property files are available for staff when valuing both residential and commercial properties.

BOMA SF-PAC Slate Card for the June 7, 2016 Election




BOMA San Francisco's Political Action Committee's Slate Card
June 7, 2016 Election

Did you know that BOMA San Francisco has a Political Action Committee that campaigns for candidates and issues that promote the economic vitality of the industry and the City and County of San Francisco?

The BOMA SF-PAC is looking forward to the June 7, 2016 election and our members have already endorsed candidates for elected office and taken positions on the following propositions in San Francisco (click here to learn more about the various measures). If you are a registered voter in San Francisco, please reference this guide when you vote!

If you have any questions, please contact Ken Cleaveland at kenc@boma.com and John Bozeman at johnb@boma.com.

Local Propositions 

SUPPORT --- Proposition A - Public Health and Safety Bond                                                    
NO POSITION ---Proposition B - Park, Recreation and Open Space Fund                              
NO POSITION --- Proposition C - Affordable Housing Requirements                                                
NO POSITION--- Proposition D - Office of Citizen Complaints Investigations                                  
SUPPORT --- Proposition E - Paid Sick Leave

Regional Proposition

SUPPORT --- Proposition AA - San Francisco Bay Clean Water, Pollution Prevention and Habitat Restoration Program      

CANDIDATE ENDORSEMENTS

San Francisco's Democratic County Central Committee, or DCCC, is the governing body of the local Democratic Party. The DCCC is comprised of local Democrats elected by voters in each Assembly District (AD), 17 and 19 as well as partisan-level Democratic elected officials and nominees who serve as Ex-Officio Officers.

The BOMA San Francisco Political Action Committee has endorsed a moderate slate of candidates that will continue to work hard for all within the Democratic party in San Francisco. 

DCCC AD17


Joshua Arce, London Breed, Malia Cohen, Zoe Dunning, Tom Hsieh, Gary McCoy, Leah Pimental, Rebecca Prozan, Alix Rosenthal, Arlo Smith, Frances Tsang, Scott Wiener, Jill Wynns

DCCC AD19

Kat Anderson, Keith Baraka, Joel Engardio, Mark Farrell, Tom A. Hsieh, Mary Jung, Trevor McNeil, Emily Murase, Rachel Norton, Marjan Philhour

California State Senate - District 11



The BOMA SF-PAC is supporting Scott Wiener for California State Senate, District 11. Learn more about this outstanding moderate candidate by clicking here.

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

San Francisco Business Registration Renewal Deadline and Resources for BOMA Members - May 31, 2016




The San Francisco business registration renewal deadline is May 31, 2016 for the fiscal year starting July 1, 2016 and ending June 30, 2017. 

Every one of the over 100,000 registered businesses in San Francisco must renew their business registration by the end of the month. You may have questions about the process, so we are sharing three major resources, below:
  • Online video tutorials so taxpayers can learn more about the online filing process before they complete their return. These online filing tutorials are available in English, Spanish, Cantonese and Tagalog.
  • Questions can be submitted electronically any time at http://sftreasurer.org/contact-us and a customer service representative will contact them on the same day of the request if submitted prior to 7:00 pm. Requests received after 7:00 pm will receive a response by the next business day.
  • For those taxpayers that would like additional in person guidance wih completing their online return, Taxpayer Assistance Days in the South Light Court of City Hall are available: May 27 and May 31, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Thursday, May 12, 2016

BOMA Members Meet with Leaders of The Port of San Francisco


BOMA San Francisco's Government Affairs Policy Analysis Committee (GAPAC) members met with Elaine Forbes, Interim Director and Susan Reynolds, Deputy Director of Real Estate for the Port of San Francisco.



It was an engaging meeting with the Port leaders; Here are a few of the topics that were discussed:

  • San Francisco's Sea Wall
    • Estimated $5 billion needed for overall seawall upgrades
  • Port of San Francisco's Strategic Plan
  • Commercial Real Estate and the Port
    • The Port has about 600 very diverse tenants, e.g., the San Francisco Giants and the Exploratorium are tenants, with a territory that extends from Aquatic Park to Pier 96 in San Francisco. 
      • 88 square feet is the occupancy of their smallest tenant!
    • 25 finger piers still exist.
      • Some need to be retained and repaired; a challenge is that they must have a maritime use.
      • Pier 45 is an active fish processing area.
    • Port property cannot be sold so leasing has transpired since 1968. 
    • The Port's real estate department has 20 employees including 5 property managers.
    • Class C buildings constitute a majority of the structures within the Port's jurisdiction.
    • Challenges
      • Regulatory framework for the Port and perspective tenant can be issue. This is especially true for leases that include a large amount of square footage as there are, generally, high infrastructure costs associated with tenancy with the Port. 
      • Use restrictions are also deal breakers for some possible tenants.
Elaine Forbes was appointed as Interim Director of the Port of San Francisco in February 2016 following the resignation of longtime Director Monique Moyer. She was previously responsible for directing and managing all internal support services for other Port divisions and the executive staff; overseeing business services, inventory and purchasing; managing information systems, human resources, finance, accounting and infrastructure maintenance function; and formulating division-wide budget, business and strategic plans.

Susan Reynolds joined the Port of San Francisco's executive team in November 2006 as Deputy Director of Real Estate. She is responsible for directing, promoting and managing the Port's real estate portfolio along the 7.5 miles of San Francisco's waterfront that extends from Fisherman's Wharf to Bayview/Hunters Point.

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

BOMA SF-PAC Slate Card for the June 7, 2016 Election




BOMA San Francisco's Political Action Committee's Slate Card
June 7, 2016 Election


The BOMA SF-PAC is looking forward to the June 7, 2016 election and our members have already endorsed candidates for elected office and taken positions on the following propositions in San Francisco (click here to learn more about the various measures):

Local Propositions 

SUPPORT --- Proposition A - Public Health and Safety Bond                                                      
NO POSITION ---Proposition B - Park, Recreation and Open Space Fund                                
NO POSITION --- Proposition C - Affordable Housing Requirements                                                  
NO POSITION--- Proposition D - Office of Citizen Complaints Investigations                                    
SUPPORT --- Proposition E - Paid Sick Leave

Regional Proposition

SUPPORT --- Proposition AA - San Francisco Bay Clean Water, Pollution Prevention and Habitat Restoration Program        

CANDIDATE ENDORSEMENTS

San Francisco's Democratic County Central Committee, or DCCC, is the governing body of the local Democratic Party. The DCCC is comprised of local Democrats elected by voters in each Assembly District (AD), 17 and 19 as well as partisan-level Democratic elected officials and nominees who serve as Ex-Officio Officers.

The BOMA San Francisco Political Action Committee has endorsed a moderate slate of candidates that will continue to work hard for all within the Democratic party in San Francisco. 

DCCC AD17


Joshua Arce, London Breed, Malia Cohen, Zoe Dunning, Tom Hsieh, Gary McCoy, Leah Pimental, Rebecca Prozan, Alix Rosenthal, Arlo Smith, Frances Tsang, Scott Wiener, Jill Wynns

DCCC AD19

Kat Anderson, Keith Baraka, Joel Engardio, Mark Farrell, Tom A. Hsieh, Mary Jung, Trevor McNeil, Emily Murase, Rachel Norton, Marjan Philhour

California State Senate - District 11



The BOMA SF-PAC is supporting Scott Wiener for California State Senate, District 11. Learn more about this outstanding moderate candidate by clicking here.

Thursday, April 21, 2016

UPDATE: San Francisco's Transportation Sustainability Program and Transportation Sustainability Fee



UPDATE - April 21, 2016

On March 3, 2016, San Francisco Planning Commission adopted a new resolution to immediately update the environmental review process with the state-proposed guidelines that modernize the way city officials measure the transportation impacts of new development projects.

For decades, environmental analysis of transportation impacts focused on how quickly cars moved through a given intersection, a flawed approach that was expensive to calculate, did little to benefit the environment and promoted urban sprawl rather than smart infill growth. The new approach is more comprehensive, looking at the method of travel, how far the person is going, and how many other people are in the vehicle to determine the impact on the environment.

The resolution to take immediate action represents the Align component of the Transportation Sustainability Program, a three-part citywide policy initiative to help transportation keep pace with growth in the city.

More Updates


Introduction of Transportation Demand Management: SHIFT

On February 11, 2016, Planning Department staff provided a brief overview on the Transportation Sustainability Program’s SHIFT component, the proposed Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Ordinance. TDM describes strategies or measures that incentivize sustainable ways of getting around. These types of travel choices are good for the environment, help manage congestion and improve the efficiency of the transportation network. The City is working on shifting travel choices as San Francisco grows, making it easier for new arrivals to take transit, bike or other efficient travel methods rather than moving to the city with a car.

On April 28, 2016, Planning Department staff will initiate a Planning Code Amendment for the TDM Ordinance. In addition, the TDM project team will be presenting the Ordinance to various neighborhood Citizen Advisory Committees this spring. Please see below for a list of the upcoming meetings before the Ordinance will be introduced at the Board of Supervisors.

Visit our Shift page for the executive summary and a copy of the presentation that was provided at the February 11th Planning Commission hearing. We intend on updating this page soon with more information related to the TDM Ordinance, so please stay tuned.

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UPDATE - March 31, 2016

Recently, Mayor Ed Lee vetoed the Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF) increase that passed the Board of Supervisors in February. Click here to read an article in the San Francisco Examiner that provides more details.

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UPDATE - February 29, 2016

BOMA San Francisco's Advocacy Team and members, along with the greater business community, continue to advocate for the commercial real estate industry's interest regarding the Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF) increase.

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors have approved an amendment to the TSF, originally passed in December 2015. The amendment increases the TSF $2 to $21.04 per square foot for non-residential construction over 100,000 square feet, citywide.

The proposal requires one more vote by the Board and then it is sent to the Mayor for his consideration.

--------------------

UPDATE - December 16, 2015

At their December 8, 2015 meeting, a majority of San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted to amend the Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF) and increase the number to $21.04 per square foot for non-residential square footage over 99,999. It would also require non-residential projects that submitted an application before July 21, 2015, but have not received final approval, to pay 50% of the difference between the TSF and the Transportation Impact Development Fee.

The legislation has been referred back to Land Use and Transportation Committee and your BOMA Advocacy team will continue to monitor the measure's progress.

Please email johnb@boma.com and kenc@boma.com with your questions or concerns.

--------------------

UPDATE - October 30, 2015

BOMA San Francisco members and staff continue to monitor this legislation.

A recent San Francisco Examiner article sums up the most recent discussion, earlier this month. At this point, it appears that commercial office developers with projects in excess of 100,000 square feet will see an increase of the fee from $18.04 to $19.04 per square foot.

Note that BOMA San Francisco's Government Affairs Committee members will meet with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) staff in charge of implementing this fee and program, as well as SFMTA Director, Ed Reiskin. The meeting will take place on November 4th, at 12 noon.

Please email johnb@boma.com if you are interested in attending this important gathering.

--------------------

UPDATE - September 30, 2015

At a recent meeting of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors’ Land Use and Transportation Committee, there was a debate regarding the proposal to change the current Transit Impact Development Fee (TIDF) into a Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF) and to apply it to all new developments except affordable housing projects.

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) proposal would increase fees for a majority of new developments - including commercial projects where the fee would increase from $12.06 per square foot to $18.04 per square foot. Activists feel that this fee should be higher and the proposal incorporate other changes. 

The suggested amendments include reducing the discount for projects already underway and not allowing the SFMTA to specify that 60% of the proceeds from the new TSF go to maintenance of San Francisco's transit system. The SFMTA is concerned that raising these fees higher than proposed, both for commercial, residential, and other projects could stymie the growth in San Francisco.

If you have any questions or concerns, please email kenc@boma.com and johnb@boma.com. BOMA developer members have been asked to provide their thoughts and we would appreciate your feedback if you feel that any increase in the TSF than what is proposed by the SFMTA, below, would affect your project - or future projects - adversely.

The SFMTA proposal will be heard again at the San Francisco Board of Supervisors’ Land Use and Transportation Committee on October 5th.
---------------------

Original Post - September 24, 2015

BOMA staff met recently with representatives from the City and County of San Francisco regarding the upcoming Transportation Sustainability Program (TSP) and Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF). 

The Transportation Sustainability Program is about keeping people moving as the City grows. Smart planning and investment will help ensure that San Franciscans are able to arrive safer and more comfortably at their destinations now and in the future.  

The proposed Transportation Sustainability Fee will help fund upcoming transportation changes (see below) by:
  • Creating a citywide transportation fee on new development;
  • Update to existing Transportation Impact Development Fee (TIDF) – expands applicability to include market-rate residential development and certain large institutions.
What Will the TSP Do?

The Transportation Sustainability Program is made up of three components:
  • Enhance Transportation to Support Growth
    • Fund citywide transportation improvements, like more Muni buses and trains, to help accommodate new residents and jobs. Find out more.
  • Modernize Environmental Review
    • Make the review process align with the City’s longstanding environmental policies by changing how we analyze the impacts of new development on the transportation system under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The new practices will be more reliable and emphasize travel options that create less traffic. Find out more.
  • Encourage Sustainable Travel
    • Make it easier for new residents, visitors and workers to get around through methods other than driving alone by integrating environmentally friendly travel into new developments. New practices will provide on-site amenities so people have better options than driving their car by themselves, such as car sharing and shuttle services. Find out more.
Representatives from the City and County of San Francisco will be presenting this information to BOMA San Francisco's Government Affairs Committee on November 4th. If you are interested in attending, please email johnb@boma.com for the meeting details.

San Francisco Passes Employer-Funded Paid Parental Leave: FAQs on the Groundbreaking Ordinance




Today, San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee signed the Employer Paid Parental Leave Law, introduced by Supervisor Scott Wiener. Please take a moment to review how the new law may impact you and your business by reading the following information from BOMA San Francisco member Charles L. Thompson, IV with Ogletree Deakins.

Under current California law, the state’s California Paid Family Leave (PFL) program pays employees 55 percent of their weekly wages, up to a maximum weekly benefit amount, to bond with a new child or care for a seriously ill family member. Employees contribute to this program through the State Disability Insurance (SDI) program.

The San Francisco Paid Parental Leave Ordinance requires employers to pay the remaining 45 percent of an employee’s weekly wages.

Q: Which employers are covered?


A: The ordinance establishes a phase-in period. As of January 1, 2017, employers with 50 or more employees regardless of location must comply with the ordinance. As of July 1, 2017, employers with 35 or more employees regardless of location must comply with the ordinance. Beginning January 1, 2018, employers with 20 or more employees regardless of location must comply. In other words, employers may be covered even if they do not employ 50 (or 20) employees within the City of San Francisco.

Q: Which employees are eligible?

A: An employee is eligible if he or she meets four separate criteria:

The employee must have worked for the covered employer for at least 180 days before taking leave.
The employee must work at least eight hours each week within the city.
The employee must work at least 40 percent of his or her total weekly hours within the city.
The employee must be eligible to receive funds under the California PFL program for baby bonding purposes.

The ordinance bases eligibility on whether the employee works in San Francisco, not on whether the employee lives in San Francisco.

Q: How much must employers pay?

A: Employers must pay “Supplemental Compensation” that bridges the differential between the amount the state is paying and 100 percent of the employee’s normal gross weekly wage. However, employers calculate the gross wage of employees receiving the maximum weekly benefit amount under the California PFL program by dividing the state’s maximum weekly benefit amount by the percentage rate of wage replacement provided the PFL program.

Q: May employers require that employees use their accumulated vacation time?

A: Yes. Employers may require that employees use up to two weeks of accrued unused vacation at the start of the leave. If an employee refuses, the employer is relieved of the obligation to pay Supplemental Compensation.

Q: Are employers required to post a notice?

A: Yes, a covered employer must post, in a conspicuous place, a notice prepared by the city. Employers must post the notice in English, Spanish, Chinese, and any language spoken by at least 5 percent of the workforce at the worksite.

Q: Are employers required to retain records?

A: Yes, employers must retain records documenting Supplemental Compensation for a period of three years.

Q: What other rights does the ordinance provide employees?

A: The ordinance protects employees from discrimination and/or retaliation for exercising their rights to Supplemental Compensation. A covered employer that takes adverse action against an employee within 90 days of the employee engaging in protected activity, such as filing a complaint or cooperating with an investigation, faces a rebuttable presumption that the employer retaliated against the employee. The employer can overcome the presumption only through clear and convincing evidence establishing that it took the action solely for a reason that was not retaliatory.

Q: Does the ordinance apply to employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement?

A: Yes, the ordinance applies to employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement unless either (1) the agreement expressly waives the ordinance in clear and unambiguous terms, or (2) the agreement was entered into before the ordinance’s effective date.

Q: How is the ordinance enforced and what are its remedies and penalties?

A: San Francisco’s Office of Labor Standards Enforcement (OLSE) has the authority to enforce the ordinance administratively through a hearing. The OLSE may order “any appropriate relief,” including payment of Supplemental Compensation withheld and an additional amount to the employee that is the greater of $250 or the amount withheld times three. The agency also can order an administrative penalty of $50 per day to each employee whose rights were violated.

Either the city or “a person or entity acting on behalf of the public as provided for under applicable state law” may bring a civil action in court for ordinance violations. The same remedies and penalties described above, plus attorneys’ fees, apply.

San Francisco 2016 Graffiti Huddle to Fight the Blight! - Wendesday, May 4, 2016




2016 Graffiti Huddle – Fight the Blight! 

The members of the San Francisco Graffiti Advisory Board (GAB) would like to invite you to the upcoming 2016 Graffiti Huddle – Fight the Blight!. Doug Hayward is our BOMA San Francisco member representative on the GAB. Thank you Doug!

Facts
  • San Francisco is a worldwide destination for graffiti vandals.
  • Graffiti vandalism is a major source of San Francisco’s urban blight.
  • The San Francisco Graffiti Advisory Board (GAB) is bringing together graffiti vandalism fighters, citizens, artists, anti-graffiti vandalism vendors, merchants and City officials to address effective methods in reclaiming our city.
  • You will be updated on what the board has been doing, programs that have been created, the challenges the City is facing regarding graffiti vandalism, new legislation, as well as, steps you can take to avoid being a victim of graffiti vandalism.
  • The event will close out with a round table discussion where you can provide innovative ideas on how to combat graffiti vandalism and urban blight in San Francisco.
Attendees

✓ Victims of graffiti vandalism
✓ Residents
✓ Business and property owners and managers
✓ Neighborhood action groups
✓ Graffiti vandalism activists
✓ Artists
✓ Students
✓ All members of the community with a vested interested in conquering urban blight

Schedule & Location
  • When: Wednesday, May 4, 2016
  • Registration begins: 12:00 PM
  • Exhibit Hall: 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM
  • Conference: 1:30 PM - 5PM
  • Where: Hilton – Financial District (Ballroom), 750 Kearny Street
Program
  • Exhibit Hall
  • Welcome and introductions
  • Presentations
  • Education
  • Abatement
  • Law Enforcement
  • Round table discussion and idea board
It’s FREE and space is limited so register today at www.zerograffitisf.com or get your FREE ticket by going directly to EVENTBRITE.

Please share this invitation with other BOMA members who would be interested in attending this event.

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

UPDATE: San Francisco Stormwater Design Guidelines



UPDATE - March 31, 2016

Following up on the Open House presentation last fall, the Stormwater Management Ordinance has been introduced and is making its way through the legislative process at San Francisco's City Hall.

Please click here to review the legislative digest and here to read the ordinance. Send any comments you may have to John Bozeman to johnb@boma.com

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UPDATE - November 12, 2015

The San Francisco's Public Utilities Commission's (SFPUC) Urban Watershed Management Program has completed the Open House series, which outlined the updates to the Stormwater Design Guidelines that are anticipated to become effective in Early 2016.

Click here to review the Open House presentation that contains information on the updates to the Stormwater Design Guidelines.

Below are a few of the major changes:
  • A new name! The Stormwater Design Guidelines will be called the Stormwater Management Requirements (SMR) once the changes become effective in Early 2016. 
  • The threshold at which project must comply with the SMR has been redefined. In the 2010 Guidelines, projects disturbing 5,000 square feet or more of the ground surface were subject to the requirements. In the revision, the threshold for Large Projects has been revised to projects creating and/or replacing 5,000 square feet or more of impervious surface.
  • Small Projects are regulated under the 2015 SMR. Small Projects are those that create and/or replace 2,500-5,000 square feet of impervious surface in the Separate Sewer Area ONLY. Projects of this size were not regulated in the 2010 Guidelines.
---------------------
UPDATE - September 30, 2015

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission’s (SFPUC) Urban Watershed Management Program (UWMP) has been working over the past year to implement regulatory-driven updates to the 2010 Stormwater Design Guidelines (Guidelines). We are pleased to present you with the Final Draft of the newly named Stormwater Management Requirements and Design Guidelines (SMR) and the associated appendices for your review. Some of the major changes include:
  • The threshold at which projects must comply with the SMR has been redefined. In the 2010 Guidelines, projects disturbing 5,000 square feet or more of the ground surface were subject to the requirements. In the revision, projects creating and/or replacing 5,000 square feet or more of impervious surface are subject to the requirements.
  • Small Projects are regulated in separate sewer areas under the 2015 SMR. Small Projects (those creating and/or replacing 2,500-5,000 square feet of impervious surface) must implement one or more Site Design Measure(s). Projects of this size were not regulated in the 2010 Guidelines.
The changes above have been made for regulatory compliance. There are additional changes throughout the document that reflect the knowledge gained through five years of implementation of the Stormwater Design Guidelines. Our goal is to provide a resource that outlines the stormwater management requirements clearly while providing technical assistance and inspiration for green infrastructure design that is beautiful and functional.

The team would appreciate feedback on the technical content of the text, its general clarity, and the overall completeness of the document. Understanding that we all have busy schedules, this is merely an opportunity to comment and comments are not required. Feel free to concentrate your review on relevant sections.

Please submit your comments via email using the Stormwater Management Requirements Comment Sheet, included in the linked folder below. Comments are due to Polly Perkins (pperkins@sfwater.org) by COB Friday, Oct 9th.

The documents can be downloaded from: https://sfpuc.sharefile.com/d-s6286a375ff841f38

Thank you in advance for your help in making the Stormwater Management Requirements and Design Guidelines clear, useful, and inspiring.
--------------------
UPDATE - July 31, 2014


BOMA San Francisco Members

Please click here to view a Stormwater Design Guidelines presentation to BOMA San Francisco's Codes and Regulations Committee members recently. Also discussed at the gathering was the SFPUC Non-Potable Water Guidebook, as several BOMA members have expressed interest in non-potable water reuse.

If you have any questions please feel free to reach out to:

Mike Adamow
Urban Watershed Management Program
Wastewater Enterprise
San Francisco Public Utilities Commission
525 Golden Gate Ave., 11th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94102
madamow@sfwater.org | 415-934-3904

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Original Post - April 14, 2010

BOMA San Francisco Members:

Thank you for your feedback on the San Francisco Stormwater Management Ordinance that would amend the San Francisco Public Works Code to require the development and maintenance of stormwater management controls for specified activities that disturb 5,000 square fee or more of the ground surface including, but not limited to, the construction, modification, conversion, or alteration of any building or structure and associated grading, filling, excavation, change in the existing topography, and the addition or replacement of impervious surface.  The measure will also create a Stormwater Management Plan to verify that no additional run-off will be created by a new development/project, and that any such new run-off is being properly treated or mitigated in an approved fashion.

UPDATE! - As of April 14, 2010

After reviewing the ordinance, your BOMA San Francisco Advocacy Team and Codes and Regulations Committee members have determined that this measure--approved by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors on April 13, 2010--will have a minimal  impact on the BOMA San Francisco membership.   

You can download a copy of the ordinance, here, and the stormwater design guidelines, here.

What are Stormwater Design Guidelines?

The Port of San Francisco (Port) and the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) are developing the San Francisco Stormwater Design Guidelines (“Design Guidelines”).  The Design Guidelines will improve San Francisco’s environment by reducing pollution in stormwater runoff in areas of new development and redevelopment. The Design Guidelines will be applied in areas of San Francisco served by separate storm sewers that discharge directly to local lakes or San Francisco Bay.  Given current trends in development, at this time mostly Bay waterfront parcels will be affected.

Please click here to review the Stormwater Design Guidelines.

What is stormwater runoff and why is it a concern?

Stormwater runoff is rainwater that flows over the land surface and through collection pipes.  In vegetated areas such as forests, fields and wetlands, rainwater seeps slowly into the ground, limiting runoff.  However, when rain falls on paved concrete and other hard (impervious) surfaces such as those found in most of San Francisco, it runs off quickly and is conveyed by pipes and other drainage features.  Though starting as relatively pure rainwater, stormwater runoff collects pollutants as it flows over impervious surfaces.  For example, runoff from parking lots picks up oil and grease from leaking engines, copper from worn brake linings, and zinc from tires. Although most runoff in San Francisco flows into the combined sewer system and receives treatment at the city’s two sewage treatment plants, there are a few areas in the city that discharge directly into  San Francisco Bay or other surface water such as Lake Merced without receiving any treatment.  These polluted stormwater flows can be detrimental to aquatic and other life.  The Design Guidelines will help improve San Francisco’s environment by reducing pollution in water that runs to the bay or other waters from newly constructed facilities.

How can San Francisco help reduce the detrimental impacts of stormwater runoff? 

One way to help reduce the detrimental impacts of stormwater runoff is by changing the way we approach new construction.  New development and redevelopment projects can be designed to minimize pollutant exposure within the project area.  Through careful pre-construction planning and designing, new development and redevelopment projects can be built to:

  • Minimize impervious surfaces, which would allow more rainfall to soak into the ground
  • Reduce the volume and intensity of storm water runoff, which would reduce flows that end up in the receiving waters 
  • Convey and treat storm water runoff using landscape features and other “green” systems  to provide treatment to the pollutants in the runoff

Studies performed around the world show that proactive site planning and design is the most cost-effective approach for reducing stormwater pollution.

What is San Francisco doing to address stormwater impacts associated with new development and redevelopment projects?

As the owners and operators of San Francisco’s storm drain systems, the Port and the SFPUC have teamed to develop the San Francisco Stormwater Design Guidelines.  The  Design Guidelines will apply to new development and redevelopment in areas of San Francisco served by separate storm sewers (e.g., storm sewers that discharge directly to receiving waters).   The Port and the SFPUC invite you to participate in the development of the Design Guidelines.

Is San Francisco required to develop Stormwater Design Guidelines?

Yes - a Clean Water Act discharge permit administered by the State Water Resources Control Board requires local agencies to develop programs for the control of stormwater runoff for the life of a project (“post-construction control” of stormwater).  The Design Guidelines will comply with the mandate of this permit, while at the same time providing a vehicle through which planners, designers, engineers and developers can work together toward a more sustainable city.

Apture