Thursday, April 21, 2016

UPDATE: San Francisco's Transportation Sustainability Program and Transportation Sustainability Fee



UPDATE - April 21, 2016

On March 3, 2016, San Francisco Planning Commission adopted a new resolution to immediately update the environmental review process with the state-proposed guidelines that modernize the way city officials measure the transportation impacts of new development projects.

For decades, environmental analysis of transportation impacts focused on how quickly cars moved through a given intersection, a flawed approach that was expensive to calculate, did little to benefit the environment and promoted urban sprawl rather than smart infill growth. The new approach is more comprehensive, looking at the method of travel, how far the person is going, and how many other people are in the vehicle to determine the impact on the environment.

The resolution to take immediate action represents the Align component of the Transportation Sustainability Program, a three-part citywide policy initiative to help transportation keep pace with growth in the city.

More Updates


Introduction of Transportation Demand Management: SHIFT

On February 11, 2016, Planning Department staff provided a brief overview on the Transportation Sustainability Program’s SHIFT component, the proposed Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Ordinance. TDM describes strategies or measures that incentivize sustainable ways of getting around. These types of travel choices are good for the environment, help manage congestion and improve the efficiency of the transportation network. The City is working on shifting travel choices as San Francisco grows, making it easier for new arrivals to take transit, bike or other efficient travel methods rather than moving to the city with a car.

On April 28, 2016, Planning Department staff will initiate a Planning Code Amendment for the TDM Ordinance. In addition, the TDM project team will be presenting the Ordinance to various neighborhood Citizen Advisory Committees this spring. Please see below for a list of the upcoming meetings before the Ordinance will be introduced at the Board of Supervisors.

Visit our Shift page for the executive summary and a copy of the presentation that was provided at the February 11th Planning Commission hearing. We intend on updating this page soon with more information related to the TDM Ordinance, so please stay tuned.

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UPDATE - March 31, 2016

Recently, Mayor Ed Lee vetoed the Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF) increase that passed the Board of Supervisors in February. Click here to read an article in the San Francisco Examiner that provides more details.

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UPDATE - February 29, 2016

BOMA San Francisco's Advocacy Team and members, along with the greater business community, continue to advocate for the commercial real estate industry's interest regarding the Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF) increase.

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors have approved an amendment to the TSF, originally passed in December 2015. The amendment increases the TSF $2 to $21.04 per square foot for non-residential construction over 100,000 square feet, citywide.

The proposal requires one more vote by the Board and then it is sent to the Mayor for his consideration.

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UPDATE - December 16, 2015

At their December 8, 2015 meeting, a majority of San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted to amend the Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF) and increase the number to $21.04 per square foot for non-residential square footage over 99,999. It would also require non-residential projects that submitted an application before July 21, 2015, but have not received final approval, to pay 50% of the difference between the TSF and the Transportation Impact Development Fee.

The legislation has been referred back to Land Use and Transportation Committee and your BOMA Advocacy team will continue to monitor the measure's progress.

Please email johnb@boma.com and kenc@boma.com with your questions or concerns.

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UPDATE - October 30, 2015

BOMA San Francisco members and staff continue to monitor this legislation.

A recent San Francisco Examiner article sums up the most recent discussion, earlier this month. At this point, it appears that commercial office developers with projects in excess of 100,000 square feet will see an increase of the fee from $18.04 to $19.04 per square foot.

Note that BOMA San Francisco's Government Affairs Committee members will meet with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) staff in charge of implementing this fee and program, as well as SFMTA Director, Ed Reiskin. The meeting will take place on November 4th, at 12 noon.

Please email johnb@boma.com if you are interested in attending this important gathering.

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UPDATE - September 30, 2015

At a recent meeting of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors’ Land Use and Transportation Committee, there was a debate regarding the proposal to change the current Transit Impact Development Fee (TIDF) into a Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF) and to apply it to all new developments except affordable housing projects.

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) proposal would increase fees for a majority of new developments - including commercial projects where the fee would increase from $12.06 per square foot to $18.04 per square foot. Activists feel that this fee should be higher and the proposal incorporate other changes. 

The suggested amendments include reducing the discount for projects already underway and not allowing the SFMTA to specify that 60% of the proceeds from the new TSF go to maintenance of San Francisco's transit system. The SFMTA is concerned that raising these fees higher than proposed, both for commercial, residential, and other projects could stymie the growth in San Francisco.

If you have any questions or concerns, please email kenc@boma.com and johnb@boma.com. BOMA developer members have been asked to provide their thoughts and we would appreciate your feedback if you feel that any increase in the TSF than what is proposed by the SFMTA, below, would affect your project - or future projects - adversely.

The SFMTA proposal will be heard again at the San Francisco Board of Supervisors’ Land Use and Transportation Committee on October 5th.
---------------------

Original Post - September 24, 2015

BOMA staff met recently with representatives from the City and County of San Francisco regarding the upcoming Transportation Sustainability Program (TSP) and Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF). 

The Transportation Sustainability Program is about keeping people moving as the City grows. Smart planning and investment will help ensure that San Franciscans are able to arrive safer and more comfortably at their destinations now and in the future.  

The proposed Transportation Sustainability Fee will help fund upcoming transportation changes (see below) by:
  • Creating a citywide transportation fee on new development;
  • Update to existing Transportation Impact Development Fee (TIDF) – expands applicability to include market-rate residential development and certain large institutions.
What Will the TSP Do?

The Transportation Sustainability Program is made up of three components:
  • Enhance Transportation to Support Growth
    • Fund citywide transportation improvements, like more Muni buses and trains, to help accommodate new residents and jobs. Find out more.
  • Modernize Environmental Review
    • Make the review process align with the City’s longstanding environmental policies by changing how we analyze the impacts of new development on the transportation system under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The new practices will be more reliable and emphasize travel options that create less traffic. Find out more.
  • Encourage Sustainable Travel
    • Make it easier for new residents, visitors and workers to get around through methods other than driving alone by integrating environmentally friendly travel into new developments. New practices will provide on-site amenities so people have better options than driving their car by themselves, such as car sharing and shuttle services. Find out more.
Representatives from the City and County of San Francisco will be presenting this information to BOMA San Francisco's Government Affairs Committee on November 4th. If you are interested in attending, please email johnb@boma.com for the meeting details.

San Francisco Passes Employer-Funded Paid Parental Leave: FAQs on the Groundbreaking Ordinance




Today, San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee signed the Employer Paid Parental Leave Law, introduced by Supervisor Scott Wiener. Please take a moment to review how the new law may impact you and your business by reading the following information from BOMA San Francisco member Charles L. Thompson, IV with Ogletree Deakins.

Under current California law, the state’s California Paid Family Leave (PFL) program pays employees 55 percent of their weekly wages, up to a maximum weekly benefit amount, to bond with a new child or care for a seriously ill family member. Employees contribute to this program through the State Disability Insurance (SDI) program.

The San Francisco Paid Parental Leave Ordinance requires employers to pay the remaining 45 percent of an employee’s weekly wages.

Q: Which employers are covered?


A: The ordinance establishes a phase-in period. As of January 1, 2017, employers with 50 or more employees regardless of location must comply with the ordinance. As of July 1, 2017, employers with 35 or more employees regardless of location must comply with the ordinance. Beginning January 1, 2018, employers with 20 or more employees regardless of location must comply. In other words, employers may be covered even if they do not employ 50 (or 20) employees within the City of San Francisco.

Q: Which employees are eligible?

A: An employee is eligible if he or she meets four separate criteria:

The employee must have worked for the covered employer for at least 180 days before taking leave.
The employee must work at least eight hours each week within the city.
The employee must work at least 40 percent of his or her total weekly hours within the city.
The employee must be eligible to receive funds under the California PFL program for baby bonding purposes.

The ordinance bases eligibility on whether the employee works in San Francisco, not on whether the employee lives in San Francisco.

Q: How much must employers pay?

A: Employers must pay “Supplemental Compensation” that bridges the differential between the amount the state is paying and 100 percent of the employee’s normal gross weekly wage. However, employers calculate the gross wage of employees receiving the maximum weekly benefit amount under the California PFL program by dividing the state’s maximum weekly benefit amount by the percentage rate of wage replacement provided the PFL program.

Q: May employers require that employees use their accumulated vacation time?

A: Yes. Employers may require that employees use up to two weeks of accrued unused vacation at the start of the leave. If an employee refuses, the employer is relieved of the obligation to pay Supplemental Compensation.

Q: Are employers required to post a notice?

A: Yes, a covered employer must post, in a conspicuous place, a notice prepared by the city. Employers must post the notice in English, Spanish, Chinese, and any language spoken by at least 5 percent of the workforce at the worksite.

Q: Are employers required to retain records?

A: Yes, employers must retain records documenting Supplemental Compensation for a period of three years.

Q: What other rights does the ordinance provide employees?

A: The ordinance protects employees from discrimination and/or retaliation for exercising their rights to Supplemental Compensation. A covered employer that takes adverse action against an employee within 90 days of the employee engaging in protected activity, such as filing a complaint or cooperating with an investigation, faces a rebuttable presumption that the employer retaliated against the employee. The employer can overcome the presumption only through clear and convincing evidence establishing that it took the action solely for a reason that was not retaliatory.

Q: Does the ordinance apply to employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement?

A: Yes, the ordinance applies to employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement unless either (1) the agreement expressly waives the ordinance in clear and unambiguous terms, or (2) the agreement was entered into before the ordinance’s effective date.

Q: How is the ordinance enforced and what are its remedies and penalties?

A: San Francisco’s Office of Labor Standards Enforcement (OLSE) has the authority to enforce the ordinance administratively through a hearing. The OLSE may order “any appropriate relief,” including payment of Supplemental Compensation withheld and an additional amount to the employee that is the greater of $250 or the amount withheld times three. The agency also can order an administrative penalty of $50 per day to each employee whose rights were violated.

Either the city or “a person or entity acting on behalf of the public as provided for under applicable state law” may bring a civil action in court for ordinance violations. The same remedies and penalties described above, plus attorneys’ fees, apply.

San Francisco 2016 Graffiti Huddle to Fight the Blight! - Wendesday, May 4, 2016




2016 Graffiti Huddle – Fight the Blight! 

The members of the San Francisco Graffiti Advisory Board (GAB) would like to invite you to the upcoming 2016 Graffiti Huddle – Fight the Blight!. Doug Hayward is our BOMA San Francisco member representative on the GAB. Thank you Doug!

Facts
  • San Francisco is a worldwide destination for graffiti vandals.
  • Graffiti vandalism is a major source of San Francisco’s urban blight.
  • The San Francisco Graffiti Advisory Board (GAB) is bringing together graffiti vandalism fighters, citizens, artists, anti-graffiti vandalism vendors, merchants and City officials to address effective methods in reclaiming our city.
  • You will be updated on what the board has been doing, programs that have been created, the challenges the City is facing regarding graffiti vandalism, new legislation, as well as, steps you can take to avoid being a victim of graffiti vandalism.
  • The event will close out with a round table discussion where you can provide innovative ideas on how to combat graffiti vandalism and urban blight in San Francisco.
Attendees

✓ Victims of graffiti vandalism
✓ Residents
✓ Business and property owners and managers
✓ Neighborhood action groups
✓ Graffiti vandalism activists
✓ Artists
✓ Students
✓ All members of the community with a vested interested in conquering urban blight

Schedule & Location
  • When: Wednesday, May 4, 2016
  • Registration begins: 12:00 PM
  • Exhibit Hall: 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM
  • Conference: 1:30 PM - 5PM
  • Where: Hilton – Financial District (Ballroom), 750 Kearny Street
Program
  • Exhibit Hall
  • Welcome and introductions
  • Presentations
  • Education
  • Abatement
  • Law Enforcement
  • Round table discussion and idea board
It’s FREE and space is limited so register today at www.zerograffitisf.com or get your FREE ticket by going directly to EVENTBRITE.

Please share this invitation with other BOMA members who would be interested in attending this event.

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

UPDATE: San Francisco Stormwater Design Guidelines



UPDATE - March 31, 2016

Following up on the Open House presentation last fall, the Stormwater Management Ordinance has been introduced and is making its way through the legislative process at San Francisco's City Hall.

Please click here to review the legislative digest and here to read the ordinance. Send any comments you may have to John Bozeman to johnb@boma.com

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UPDATE - November 12, 2015

The San Francisco's Public Utilities Commission's (SFPUC) Urban Watershed Management Program has completed the Open House series, which outlined the updates to the Stormwater Design Guidelines that are anticipated to become effective in Early 2016.

Click here to review the Open House presentation that contains information on the updates to the Stormwater Design Guidelines.

Below are a few of the major changes:
  • A new name! The Stormwater Design Guidelines will be called the Stormwater Management Requirements (SMR) once the changes become effective in Early 2016. 
  • The threshold at which project must comply with the SMR has been redefined. In the 2010 Guidelines, projects disturbing 5,000 square feet or more of the ground surface were subject to the requirements. In the revision, the threshold for Large Projects has been revised to projects creating and/or replacing 5,000 square feet or more of impervious surface.
  • Small Projects are regulated under the 2015 SMR. Small Projects are those that create and/or replace 2,500-5,000 square feet of impervious surface in the Separate Sewer Area ONLY. Projects of this size were not regulated in the 2010 Guidelines.
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UPDATE - September 30, 2015

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission’s (SFPUC) Urban Watershed Management Program (UWMP) has been working over the past year to implement regulatory-driven updates to the 2010 Stormwater Design Guidelines (Guidelines). We are pleased to present you with the Final Draft of the newly named Stormwater Management Requirements and Design Guidelines (SMR) and the associated appendices for your review. Some of the major changes include:
  • The threshold at which projects must comply with the SMR has been redefined. In the 2010 Guidelines, projects disturbing 5,000 square feet or more of the ground surface were subject to the requirements. In the revision, projects creating and/or replacing 5,000 square feet or more of impervious surface are subject to the requirements.
  • Small Projects are regulated in separate sewer areas under the 2015 SMR. Small Projects (those creating and/or replacing 2,500-5,000 square feet of impervious surface) must implement one or more Site Design Measure(s). Projects of this size were not regulated in the 2010 Guidelines.
The changes above have been made for regulatory compliance. There are additional changes throughout the document that reflect the knowledge gained through five years of implementation of the Stormwater Design Guidelines. Our goal is to provide a resource that outlines the stormwater management requirements clearly while providing technical assistance and inspiration for green infrastructure design that is beautiful and functional.

The team would appreciate feedback on the technical content of the text, its general clarity, and the overall completeness of the document. Understanding that we all have busy schedules, this is merely an opportunity to comment and comments are not required. Feel free to concentrate your review on relevant sections.

Please submit your comments via email using the Stormwater Management Requirements Comment Sheet, included in the linked folder below. Comments are due to Polly Perkins (pperkins@sfwater.org) by COB Friday, Oct 9th.

The documents can be downloaded from: https://sfpuc.sharefile.com/d-s6286a375ff841f38

Thank you in advance for your help in making the Stormwater Management Requirements and Design Guidelines clear, useful, and inspiring.
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UPDATE - July 31, 2014


BOMA San Francisco Members

Please click here to view a Stormwater Design Guidelines presentation to BOMA San Francisco's Codes and Regulations Committee members recently. Also discussed at the gathering was the SFPUC Non-Potable Water Guidebook, as several BOMA members have expressed interest in non-potable water reuse.

If you have any questions please feel free to reach out to:

Mike Adamow
Urban Watershed Management Program
Wastewater Enterprise
San Francisco Public Utilities Commission
525 Golden Gate Ave., 11th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94102
madamow@sfwater.org | 415-934-3904

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Original Post - April 14, 2010

BOMA San Francisco Members:

Thank you for your feedback on the San Francisco Stormwater Management Ordinance that would amend the San Francisco Public Works Code to require the development and maintenance of stormwater management controls for specified activities that disturb 5,000 square fee or more of the ground surface including, but not limited to, the construction, modification, conversion, or alteration of any building or structure and associated grading, filling, excavation, change in the existing topography, and the addition or replacement of impervious surface.  The measure will also create a Stormwater Management Plan to verify that no additional run-off will be created by a new development/project, and that any such new run-off is being properly treated or mitigated in an approved fashion.

UPDATE! - As of April 14, 2010

After reviewing the ordinance, your BOMA San Francisco Advocacy Team and Codes and Regulations Committee members have determined that this measure--approved by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors on April 13, 2010--will have a minimal  impact on the BOMA San Francisco membership.   

You can download a copy of the ordinance, here, and the stormwater design guidelines, here.

What are Stormwater Design Guidelines?

The Port of San Francisco (Port) and the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) are developing the San Francisco Stormwater Design Guidelines (“Design Guidelines”).  The Design Guidelines will improve San Francisco’s environment by reducing pollution in stormwater runoff in areas of new development and redevelopment. The Design Guidelines will be applied in areas of San Francisco served by separate storm sewers that discharge directly to local lakes or San Francisco Bay.  Given current trends in development, at this time mostly Bay waterfront parcels will be affected.

Please click here to review the Stormwater Design Guidelines.

What is stormwater runoff and why is it a concern?

Stormwater runoff is rainwater that flows over the land surface and through collection pipes.  In vegetated areas such as forests, fields and wetlands, rainwater seeps slowly into the ground, limiting runoff.  However, when rain falls on paved concrete and other hard (impervious) surfaces such as those found in most of San Francisco, it runs off quickly and is conveyed by pipes and other drainage features.  Though starting as relatively pure rainwater, stormwater runoff collects pollutants as it flows over impervious surfaces.  For example, runoff from parking lots picks up oil and grease from leaking engines, copper from worn brake linings, and zinc from tires. Although most runoff in San Francisco flows into the combined sewer system and receives treatment at the city’s two sewage treatment plants, there are a few areas in the city that discharge directly into  San Francisco Bay or other surface water such as Lake Merced without receiving any treatment.  These polluted stormwater flows can be detrimental to aquatic and other life.  The Design Guidelines will help improve San Francisco’s environment by reducing pollution in water that runs to the bay or other waters from newly constructed facilities.

How can San Francisco help reduce the detrimental impacts of stormwater runoff? 

One way to help reduce the detrimental impacts of stormwater runoff is by changing the way we approach new construction.  New development and redevelopment projects can be designed to minimize pollutant exposure within the project area.  Through careful pre-construction planning and designing, new development and redevelopment projects can be built to:

  • Minimize impervious surfaces, which would allow more rainfall to soak into the ground
  • Reduce the volume and intensity of storm water runoff, which would reduce flows that end up in the receiving waters 
  • Convey and treat storm water runoff using landscape features and other “green” systems  to provide treatment to the pollutants in the runoff

Studies performed around the world show that proactive site planning and design is the most cost-effective approach for reducing stormwater pollution.

What is San Francisco doing to address stormwater impacts associated with new development and redevelopment projects?

As the owners and operators of San Francisco’s storm drain systems, the Port and the SFPUC have teamed to develop the San Francisco Stormwater Design Guidelines.  The  Design Guidelines will apply to new development and redevelopment in areas of San Francisco served by separate storm sewers (e.g., storm sewers that discharge directly to receiving waters).   The Port and the SFPUC invite you to participate in the development of the Design Guidelines.

Is San Francisco required to develop Stormwater Design Guidelines?

Yes - a Clean Water Act discharge permit administered by the State Water Resources Control Board requires local agencies to develop programs for the control of stormwater runoff for the life of a project (“post-construction control” of stormwater).  The Design Guidelines will comply with the mandate of this permit, while at the same time providing a vehicle through which planners, designers, engineers and developers can work together toward a more sustainable city.

Homelessness in San Francisco




BOMA San Francisco's Government Affairs Policy Advisory Committee (GAPAC) welcomed a panel from various City and County of San Francisco departments recently.  The purpose of the meeting was to help our industry understand how they are helping those who are, unfortunately, without a home in San Francisco

The panelists were:

Joyce Crum, Director, Housing and Homeless Division, Human Services Agency
Lt. Michael Nevin, SFPD
Sam Dodge, Director of Housing Opportunity, Partnerships and Engagement (HOPE), Mayor Ed Lee’s Office
Brenda Meskan, San Francisco Department of Public Health, Director San Francisco Homeless Outreach Team

The information exchange was excellent and our members felt that San Francisco is working diligently to address the homelessness issue in The City. Based on this meeting, BOMA's GAPAC members have elected to research the resources available in San Francisco to help BOMA members regarding homelessness matters.We'll post that data in a separate blog post once it has been completed.

Key takeaways from the gathering:
  • Some are homeless due to their economic situation; some are there because of mental health.
  • 13 years of lifetime homelessness = chronic homeless in San Francisco. About 250 people are on this list.
  • Issuing tickets/warrants for quality of life issues doesn’t solve homelessness.
  • San Francisco: there is 6700 homeless, 3,500 unsheltered, and 1,300 beds.
Click here for a presentation from Brenda Meskan, San Francisco Department of Public Health, Director San Francisco Homeless Outreach Team, that provides detailed information about her Department's efforts.

BOMA California Advocacy Update: Net Energy Metering & Right to Rest Act



 


Support for Net Energy Metering (NEM) Cap Calculation 

Our industry is pleased to support AB 2339 (Irwin; D-Thousand Oaks) which would apply a consistent methodology statewide for use by electric utilities when calculating the existing caps on their net energy metering (NEM) programs.

Net energy metering (NEM) is a billing service that provides credit to electric utility customers for the excess electricity supplied to the electric grid from their on-site solar photovoltaic energy systems. Existing law requires all California utilities to provide NEM up to 5% of the utility’s “aggregate customer peak demand.” In 2012, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) adopted a decision interpreting for the first time “aggregate customer peak demand.”

To date, at least five POUs have exceeded their 5% NEM caps using a methodology that is inconsistent with the large majority of the state, effectively shutting down solar growth in these areas and their contribution towards the state’s clean energy and climate goals. With at least eight more POUs rapidly approaching their caps it is critical the Legislature establish a consistent, statewide methodology so consumers will continue to have the option of choosing cleaner energy.

AB 2339 establishes the same methodology for use by publicly owned utilities as presently used by investor owned utilities when calculating their 5% caps for their respective NEM programs.


Opposition to SB 876 Right to Rest Act

Our industry unfortunately must oppose SB 876 (Liu; La Candada Flitridge) as we believe the measure will make it more difficult to keep public areas safe and clean while not actually addressing the root causes of homelessness.


SB 876 would create a new right for any homeless person to “sleep or rest” in any “public space” broadly defined as “any property that is owned by a government entity or any property upon which there is an easement for public use and that is held open to the public, including, but not limited to, plazas, courtyards, parking lots, sidewalks, public transportation facilities and services, public buildings, shopping centers, and parks.”

By declaring the right to sleep or rest on any property that has a public easement, SB 876 creates a special set of exemptions, privileges and rights for the homeless to occupy public and private property, including sidewalks, without complying with laws that apply to everyone else. Such an approach is inherently unfair and would erode the ability of property owners to operate their properties in safe, clean, and non-threatening manner.

Homelessness is a pervasive problem that must be dealt with. However, we do not believe ceding possession of lawfully owned private property to anyone that deems it a suitable place to set up camp, is the right approach.

Last year, the Sacramento Bee referred to a similar attempt to create such rights as a “nightmare scenario” wherein businesses and their patrons would be powerless to remove homeless individuals from impeding their daily activities.

Homeless individuals – like every other Californian – already have the protections offered by the U.S. and state constitutions to protect their civil liberties. This bill would create additional rights for a favored class of citizen at the expense of others’ private property rights and freedom of association.


Wednesday, April 6, 2016

DUE: San Francisco Secured Property Tax Bill





Don't Miss These Upcoming Due Dates! 

The San Francisco Office of Small Business wants to remind you of an important due date that may pertain to your business.

Secured Property Tax Bill (Second Installment) - Due on April 11, 2016

Property owners pay secured property tax annually. The secured property tax amount is based on the assessed value of the property as established each year on January 1st by the Office of the Assessor/Recorder. The secured property tax bill can be paid in two installments; the first installment is due November 1st and becomes delinquent after December 10th and the second installment is due on February 1st and becomes delinquent after April 10th. For more information on secured property tax, visit the Treasurer and Tax Collector's website.


Office of Small Business Staff


Tuesday, April 5, 2016

UPDATE: San Francisco's Transportation Sustainability Program and Transportation Sustainability Fee



UPDATE - March 31, 2016

Recently, Mayor Ed Lee vetoed the Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF) increase that passed the Board of Supervisors in February. Click here to read an article in the San Francisco Examiner that provides more details.

--------------------

UPDATE - February 29, 2016

BOMA San Francisco's Advocacy Team and members, along with the greater business community, continue to advocate for the commercial real estate industry's interest regarding the Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF) increase.

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors have approved an amendment to the TSF, originally passed in December 2015. The amendment increases the TSF $2 to $21.04 per square foot for non-residential construction over 100,000 square feet, citywide.

The proposal requires one more vote by the Board and then it is sent to the Mayor for his consideration.

--------------------

UPDATE - December 16, 2015

At their December 8, 2015 meeting, a majority of San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted to amend the Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF) and increase the number to $21.04 per square foot for non-residential square footage over 99,999. It would also require non-residential projects that submitted an application before July 21, 2015, but have not received final approval, to pay 50% of the difference between the TSF and the Transportation Impact Development Fee.

The legislation has been referred back to Land Use and Transportation Committee and your BOMA Advocacy team will continue to monitor the measure's progress.

Please email johnb@boma.com and kenc@boma.com with your questions or concerns.

--------------------

UPDATE - October 30, 2015

BOMA San Francisco members and staff continue to monitor this legislation.

A recent San Francisco Examiner article sums up the most recent discussion, earlier this month. At this point, it appears that commercial office developers with projects in excess of 100,000 square feet will see an increase of the fee from $18.04 to $19.04 per square foot.

Note that BOMA San Francisco's Government Affairs Committee members will meet with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) staff in charge of implementing this fee and program, as well as SFMTA Director, Ed Reiskin. The meeting will take place on November 4th, at 12 noon.

Please email johnb@boma.com if you are interested in attending this important gathering.

--------------------

UPDATE - September 30, 2015

At a recent meeting of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors’ Land Use and Transportation Committee, there was a debate regarding the proposal to change the current Transit Impact Development Fee (TIDF) into a Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF) and to apply it to all new developments except affordable housing projects.

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) proposal would increase fees for a majority of new developments - including commercial projects where the fee would increase from $12.06 per square foot to $18.04 per square foot. Activists feel that this fee should be higher and the proposal incorporate other changes. 

The suggested amendments include reducing the discount for projects already underway and not allowing the SFMTA to specify that 60% of the proceeds from the new TSF go to maintenance of San Francisco's transit system. The SFMTA is concerned that raising these fees higher than proposed, both for commercial, residential, and other projects could stymie the growth in San Francisco.

If you have any questions or concerns, please email kenc@boma.com and johnb@boma.com. BOMA developer members have been asked to provide their thoughts and we would appreciate your feedback if you feel that any increase in the TSF than what is proposed by the SFMTA, below, would affect your project - or future projects - adversely.

The SFMTA proposal will be heard again at the San Francisco Board of Supervisors’ Land Use and Transportation Committee on October 5th.
---------------------

Original Post - September 24, 2015

BOMA staff met recently with representatives from the City and County of San Francisco regarding the upcoming Transportation Sustainability Program (TSP) and Transportation Sustainability Fee (TSF). 

The Transportation Sustainability Program is about keeping people moving as the City grows. Smart planning and investment will help ensure that San Franciscans are able to arrive safer and more comfortably at their destinations now and in the future.  

The proposed Transportation Sustainability Fee will help fund upcoming transportation changes (see below) by:
  • Creating a citywide transportation fee on new development;
  • Update to existing Transportation Impact Development Fee (TIDF) – expands applicability to include market-rate residential development and certain large institutions.
What Will the TSP Do?

The Transportation Sustainability Program is made up of three components:
  • Enhance Transportation to Support Growth
    • Fund citywide transportation improvements, like more Muni buses and trains, to help accommodate new residents and jobs. Find out more.
  • Modernize Environmental Review
    • Make the review process align with the City’s longstanding environmental policies by changing how we analyze the impacts of new development on the transportation system under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The new practices will be more reliable and emphasize travel options that create less traffic. Find out more.
  • Encourage Sustainable Travel
    • Make it easier for new residents, visitors and workers to get around through methods other than driving alone by integrating environmentally friendly travel into new developments. New practices will provide on-site amenities so people have better options than driving their car by themselves, such as car sharing and shuttle services. Find out more.
Representatives from the City and County of San Francisco will be presenting this information to BOMA San Francisco's Government Affairs Committee on November 4th. If you are interested in attending, please email johnb@boma.com for the meeting details.

Monday, April 4, 2016

CleanPowerSF - Service to Begin in May 2016




BOMA San Francisco's Energy and Environment Committee members met recently to discuss, among other items, San Francisco's CleanPowerSF program.

State law allows cities and counties like San Francisco to pool the electricity demand of their residents and businesses for the purpose of buying electricity on behalf of those customers. These programs are called Community Choice Aggregation programs.

CleanPowerSF is San Francisco’s Community Choice Aggregation program and will provide San Francisco with new clean energy alternatives. When it begins offering service in May of 2016, CleanPowerSF will give residential and commercial electricity consumers in San Francisco a choice of having more of their electricity supplied from clean, renewable sources—such as solar, wind, bioenergy, geothermal, and hydroelectric—at competitive rates. 

By law, CleanPowerSF is an opt-out program. If you do not want to participate in CleanPowerSF, you must opt-out to stay with Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) - currently providing 27% renewable energy.

Please click here for detailed information on this program.

Questions? Please contact John Bozeman at johnb@boma.com for more information. 

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Changes to the San Francisco Business Registration Process




The San Francisco's Treasurer’s Office has gone live with online business registration. There is a nice story on their effort here

The online registration form is available at: http://sftreasurer.org/registration.

 Business starter kits, information, and other assistance is available at http://businessportal.sfgov.org.

What does this mean for BOMA San Francisco members and their small business tenants? It means that a person wishing to register their business can submit their registration online, sign a secure online form (DocuSign), and pay their registration, all in about an hour. They will get their Business Account Number (BAN) and Online PIN via email after they sign their online form. They will have to use it immediately if they wish to pay online. If the Treasurer's office needs further information because of the complex nature of the registration, staff are assigned to follow up.

Apture